Monday, March 11, 2013

National Nutrition Month, Dr. Radak, answers diet and nutrition questions from the Walden University community



As March 2013 is National Nutrition Month, Dr. Timothy Radak, academic coordinator and faculty member in the Ph.D. in Public Health program in the School of Health Sciences at Walden University, will be answering diet and nutrition questions from the Walden community. Dr. Radak is credentialed as a registered dietitian and is an expert on nutrition.
Part 1 and Part 2 are accessible below

Part 1: http://my.campuscruiser.com/q?pg=blog&eId=100001270


Part 2: http://my.campuscruiser.com/q?pg=blog&eId=100001271
 

https://www.facebook.com/waldenu/posts/10151335017146317


Your Nutrition Questions Answered

Posted by   Tamara Chumley   Posted At 08:45 AM CST
As March is National Nutrition Month, Dr. Timothy Radak, academic coordinator and faculty member in the Ph.D. in Public Health program in the School of Health Sciences at Walden University, will be answering diet and nutrition questions from the Walden community in Spotlight on Walden throughout the month. Dr. Radakis credentialed as a registered dietitian and is an expert on nutrition.
Dr. Timothy Radak, academic coordinator and faculty member in the Ph.D. in Public Health program, School of Health SciencesAsk your diet and nutrition questions on Facebook and Twitter and check in throughout the month to see ifDr. Radak answered your question!
Q. What foods help reduce aging?
Dr. Radak: Thisis a great question and certainly one that many people ask! While there is noreal anti-aging diet or way to fool Mother Nature’s chronological clock, thereare many foods that help promote our health and keep disease at bay. We all knowthat whole grains, fruits, and vegetables are healthy for us and are provenfighters against disease. Consuming these foods can not only reduce risk fordisease as we age but also provide us with energy and overall general health aswe enter into our elder years. Feeling adventurous? Try some oven-baked kalefor a snack. There are recipes all over the Web to make this at home, thoughmany stores now carry it. It’s a neat way to get greens in our diet and have asnack too.
Q. Are protein shakesa good choice to replace one of your daily meals?
Dr. Radak: Ingeneral, I don’t recommend protein shakes for regular use, but in a pinch theycan have benefits. What our bodies need are balanced and diverse meals, with avariety of foods. Obtaining our daily requirements is so much more than justprotein. Obtaining the necessary vitamins and minerals is also crucial. If youare short on time and unable to have a balanced meal, protein shakes canoccasionally replace a meal. Also note that for the majority of us, we do notneed to be overly concerned with protein intake as the standard diet mostcommonly consumed in the United States provides nearly double what ourrequirements are. Interested in knowing what your protein requirements are?Follow this simple equation to arrive at a general estimate for normal-weightindividuals: Multiply your body weight in pounds x 0.36 to provide an estimateof protein grams.
Q. What is the bestway to go carb-free? And, any tips for great ways to curb those cravings (i.e.,snacks or recipes)?
Dr. Radak: Thisis a very popular question. Contrary to what some Internet sites may suggest,going carb-free is not really the best choice for a balanced diet, for thepromotion of good health, or for curbing cravings. Fiber rich carbohydrate-containingfoods are actually one of nature’s best ways to feel full until our next meal. Thekey here is to distinguish between the two basic types of carbohydrates: refinedfoods and beverages (like sugary snacks and sodas, which are processed andcalled simple carbohydrates) and whole foods and unprocessed foods (known as complexcarbohydrates). Some of my favorite complex carb snacks include freshly cutapples with some peanut butter, bell pepper slices with hummus, or even a trailbar from time to time.
Q. Fruits aregenerally considered nutritionally beneficial to mankind. Are there fruits tobe regarded with caution?
Dr. Radak: I haveyet to see a study showing a health risk from fruits or vegetables, though somefruits, like grapefruit, may interact with certain medications. It is importantto check with your physician for food-drug interactions. I think following theprinciple of “too much of a good thing can …” could be a useful guideline ifone over-consumes any foods. Some fruits contain a lot of fructose, so thatcould be a potential concern if someone really ramps up their fruit intake.Moderation and balance of intake is always a good strategy to follow.

Visit us on Facebookor Twitter to ask Dr. Radakadditional questions throughout the month


Your Diet & Nutrition Questions Answered: Part 2

Posted by   Tamara Chumley   Posted At 09:43 AM CDT

Dr. Timothy Radak, academic coordinator and faculty member in the Ph.D. in Public Health program in the School of Health Sciences at Walden University, continues answering diet and nutrition questionsfrom the Walden community in Spotlight on Walden throughout the month.Dr. Radak is credentialed as a registered dietitian and is an expert onnutrDr. Timothy Radak, academic coordinator and faculty member in the School of Health Sciencesition.
Check out the first Q&A from earlier this month.
Q. Do essential oils help, hurt,or do nothing for diabetics?
Dr. Radak: Essential oilsare aromatic liquids derived from plants and have become increasingly popularwith the use of aromatherapy. I am not aware of many human studies evaluatingtheir use for diabetes. Some research has shown that cinnamon has had apositive effect on diabetes; however, this was in capsule form rather than asan essential oil.
Q. Why is folic acid, which isrecommended to pregnant women and also put into cereals and supplements,considered “unnatural” and a double-edged sword? Shouldn't folate, as found naturally in foods, be the preferred recommendation to the public?
Dr. Radak: One of thereasons our government decided to enrich or fortify certain commonly-consumedfoods with folic acid is because of known health risks for babies born to womenwho were below recommended levels of this important nutrient. Levels of folatefound normally in foods could meet nutritional recommendations, but research showsthat many women were still falling short of needed requirements.
Q. Is there any inherent health risk by adopting a low carbohydrate, high plant protein diet? I'm trying to lose some weight.
Dr. Radak: When consideringany type of major dietary change, it is important to consult with yourdietitian or physician as they would be able to take into account your medicalhistory when evaluating a potential dietary change. High protein intake, fromeither plant or animal products, has been associated with some health risks. Thatsaid, I personally don’t recommend any diets that are high in one dietary groupand low in another. I think the advice of following a balanced diet is sound.
Q. I have been thinking about baking my own bread using all whole wheat flour; however, I keep hearing about how bad bread is. Is this a healthy option or should bread be avoided alltogether?
Dr. Radak: I think makingyour own bread is a great idea and offers many opportunities to create endlessvarieties. There is a lot of misinformation out there regarding carbohydrates,and many fear bread, potatoes, etc. The key here is to distinguish between thetwo basic types of carbohydrates: refined foods and beverages (like sugarysnacks and sodas, which are processed and called simple carbohydrates) andwhole foods and unprocessed foods (known as complex carbohydrates), which wouldinclude whole wheat bread.
Q. What do you think about the Sensa diet?
Dr. Radak: The concept behind Sensa (a powder that is sprinkled on foods) is to modify the sense of smell and taste to accelerate satiety, or a sense of fullness, faster, in turn helping to reduce overall food intake. There are two types of powders: one for sweet foods and one for salty foods. I am suspicious of any program that suggests you can eat anything you like without the need to exercise or be conscious of overall calorie intake. I would suggest instead following the standard advice about making sure that your meal or specific food portions are at the recommended levels. Following portion control is a sound and sensible way to help steer clear of excess calorie intake and does not cost any money.
Askyour diet and nutrition questions on Facebook and Twitter and check in throughout the month to see ifDr. Radak answered your question!
Category : Feature    Tags : Faculty   Health Sciences